“The Economics Book: Big Ideas Simply Explained” Book Review

Hello everybody,

      “The Economics Book: Big Ideas Simply Explained” is a nonfiction book that explains the big concepts of economics. To call it a textbook would do it a great disservice. While the structure is comparable to a textbook (chronological order with each page explaining a concept) the writing and layout are not. The book is written precisely and clearly, further differentiating it from a textbook. I had flipped through some economics textbooks but could never bring myself to read them. The language used in textbooks is dry, repetitive, and is incoherent to the amateur economist. The Economics Book wastes little time on economic jargon. Its goal, one it unquestionably achieves, is to educate the reader on the ideas that are at the root of economics. The terms and phrases matter, but the ideas are what affect the world.

      The layout was also very helpful. The colors were bright and the font was quirky, adding a lighter feel to the book. The book also included the name of the economic concept, the key thinker who developed or expanded this idea, a timeline of important events happening before and after the idea was developed and a brief biography of the key thinker. Most importantly, they include a flowchart on each page. To me, these flowcharts were the most helpful figures in the book. The flowchart explained the rationale behind the idea by showing how one can arrive at the conclusion that is this idea. It allows us a glimpse into the minds of great economists like Marx and Maynard-Keynes. The flowcharts helped me truly understand the big ideas of economics.

      True learning is having a full grasp of the concept, knowing not only what it is but why it is. Much of the time, students are content with accepting that something exists. In doing so they rob themselves of the opportunity to learn. This book is a rewarding experience to the reader. The Economics Book can be helpful for students studying economics or even a bored teenager with too much free time. “The Economics Book” pleasantly explains what has been called  “The Dismal Science” in a way that will appeal to all types of readers.

One Word/Phrase To Sum It Up:  Engaging

676987

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s